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5

The patent description needs to be sufficiently detailed to permit "one of ordinary skill in the art" to replicate it. I don't recall having seen a patent without any drawings - particularly for inventions involving electronic circuits. The figures help to set context - worth a thousand words and all that. Look at the figures in a few other patents and ...


4

If you are afraid "anyone could look it up" - IMO you are better off treating it as a trade secret - please check this link for details http://www.wipo.int/sme/en/ip_business/trade_secrets/patent_trade.htm Also one other thing about "acquire a patent for a software algorithm" - in view of the recent Alice ruling , I would encourage you to consult a Patent ...


3

I would add to User96's good answer that the description of the patent must also show that the inventor had "possession" of the invention (though the courts have been somewhat unclear in defining possession). So a diagram or drawing can help with that as well. In general if it would help in understanding your invention, you should strongly consider ...


2

I would recommend keeping drawings at a higher level (block diagrams, etc) whenever possible. If you get too specific, you risk running into problems if you ever tweak your design. For example, you might discover that it's cheaper to use two 10k resistors in series instead of one 20k resistor, or you might have to source a part from a different ...


2

In general, patents contain simple block-diagrams which articulate the key features of the device or mechanism you wish to patent. If the key feature of your idea is embodied in a specific circuit (for the sake of argument, with say 10 components or less) then a circuit diagram is probably appropriate. If on the other hand, it's going to involve several op-...


1

The expression 'based on' looks vague and ambiguous to me. Its breadth, no matter what the cause, risks coming at a cost. If I were procuring a patent I would prefer to avoid the expression and use clearer and more definite language. One does not have to lose generic character in the search for definiteness. If I were confronted with a third-party patent ...


1

I think the answer is that it depends on the context. I have included three examples from three different patents. The first uses depending upon while the second uses based upon. I do not think the meaning would be changed if they were reversed. The third uses using. In the context, the other two terms would not make sense if placed into this claim. This is ...


1

The scope often differs from patent to patent, i would try to explain the difference using following example. In simple term the term Based on protects the underlying principle i.e., alternates that uses the same principle can be covered by this phrase. Eg 1; A patent claims an oil-based substance the claim scope can cover a lotion or a greasy or oily ...


1

Without detailed information about your novel device it's not possible to advise you. It's better to contact with some US patent attorney (if you are planning to file US patent application).


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