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4

If you are afraid "anyone could look it up" - IMO you are better off treating it as a trade secret - please check this link for details http://www.wipo.int/sme/en/ip_business/trade_secrets/patent_trade.htm Also one other thing about "acquire a patent for a software algorithm" - in view of the recent Alice ruling , I would encourage you to consult a Patent ...


2

The U.S. a requirement to describe how to make and use the invention. There is also a “written description” requirement to show that you “possess” the invention. That means you understand that it works without any further invention. It may be that one person filing an application is more concern about meeting that hurdle than another applicant or one ...


1

The expression 'based on' looks vague and ambiguous to me. Its breadth, no matter what the cause, risks coming at a cost. If I were procuring a patent I would prefer to avoid the expression and use clearer and more definite language. One does not have to lose generic character in the search for definiteness. If I were confronted with a third-party patent ...


1

I think the answer is that it depends on the context. I have included three examples from three different patents. The first uses depending upon while the second uses based upon. I do not think the meaning would be changed if they were reversed. The third uses using. In the context, the other two terms would not make sense if placed into this claim. This is ...


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The scope often differs from patent to patent, i would try to explain the difference using following example. In simple term the term Based on protects the underlying principle i.e., alternates that uses the same principle can be covered by this phrase. Eg 1; A patent claims an oil-based substance the claim scope can cover a lotion or a greasy or oily ...


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