3

If the patent was issued in the mid 1900's, then the patent is long expired. No one can "take over" the patent because the patent information is now in the public domain and free for everyone to use.


2

The patent owner is the assignee -- in this case, Jerold Manock. I didn't try to check, but I'd guess that it was subsequently assigned to Apple Computer. In any case, the assignee (and possible subsequent assignees) really own the patent. Being (one of) the inventor(s) doesn't mean you necessarily have any rights/ownership to the patented invention at all. ...


1

Assignee status itself has no bearing on whether something qualifies as prior art. In fact, if you look at § 102, you'll see that the only time who was the author of the prior art matters is for § 102(a), "the invention was known or used by others in this country..." For a published application or patent, the identity of the inventor or assignee ...


1

How do you find a company? You search on the internet. A Google search yielded this: https://www.ca-registry.com/C0480237-roto-rico-co-inc amongst other hits. Evidently, the company has dissolved.


1

On Google Patents, note that the Original Assignee is "Roblox Corporation". From an WSJ blog in 2013: Roblox raised about $7.2 million from investors including Altos Ventures and First Round Capital So, no, there does not appear to be any association with LEGO. This is a US company based in San Mateo, California. For completeness, if you check the ...


1

Ordering a certified copy of a patent from the patent office does not grant the right to practice the invention. It is simply a copy. Certified copies are commonly used when filing in a different country or when the patent is required in court. In order to practice the invention, you need to either own the patent or have permission from the owner. ...


1

Keeping the patent in your name and that of the company owner would create a joint ownership allowing either of you to exploit the patent. I am assuming that the manufacturer is the company that is owned by the company owner. If you did not assign your rights to the company, then you would have the right to sell rights to the patent to other companies, or ...


1

The answer to your primary question as I see it is that inventorship is completely determined by who actually conceived of the claimed invention and is a separate issue from any assignment. If you invented something that is claimed you are required to be shown as an inventor if an application is filed. You might have run over a fellow employee in the parking ...


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