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I have found a patent (PCT/GB2014/000088 or WO2014147361A1) which also has the following related patent documents listed: CN105189237 **EP**2976240 KR1020150138257 US20160161950 JP2016520464 IL241688

Does that mean that the patent is valid only in China, Europe, Korea, US, Japan and Israel? As far as I understand there is no such thing as a worldwide patent as WO would imply.

Is looking at the related patent documents listed and country codes the best way to see where a patent is valid?

As far as I understand this patent is not valid in India (IN), so can I use this technology without barriers?

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WO2014147361A1 is an application as is US20160161950. I'm not an expert at determining foreign patent status, but a US patent was issued: US9645576B2. You would have to examine the claims of the issued patent to see exactly what is covered by the patent. The EP2976240 (B1) document is tricky as there is no universal European patent. There are designated states so it still goes country by country. See this page for some relevant information on this patent.

You are correct that the invention is protected only in the countries that have an issued patent and only to the extent described by the claims. In addition, you should be aware that other patents may be relevant and active so just avoiding this invention may not provide freedom to operate. For instance while this patent covers an aspect of controlling autonomous vehicles, it doesn't mean avoiding this patent allows you to produce an autonomous vehicle as there are very likely other relevant patents too.

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Does that mean that the patent is valid only in China, Europe, Korea, US, Japan and Israel?

Yes.

Is looking at the related patent documents listed and country codes the best way to see where a patent is valid?

Yes, though if you go to "National Phase" and "Patent Family" you will get any available info on countries where the patent has been presented.

As far as I understand this patent is not valid in India (IN), so can I use this technology without barriers.

Yes as far as you don´t sell your products on the countries where the system has been patented. However, as Eric mentions, "lack of infringement of a given patent does not ensure freedom to operate".

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    Nice answer. Could you fix the misspelling "fas". I'm not sure what the intended word is. Also, lack of infringement of a given patent does not ensure freedom to operate. You might want to mention that although my answer does as well.
    – Eric S
    Jan 7 at 16:17

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