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I suppose you mean that you have filed a patent application in UK (not granted yet) and want to seek protection in US as well. If such is the scenario, the reply is yes, there is a way out for a UK patent application to be recognized in US. In order, to have a patent in US for the same invention (that was filed in UK) one has to file a patent application in ...


4

Can retrospective damages can be sought in states designated by a PCT application before a national phase application is granted? It depends on the country, as this is not the subject of any international treaty. I will therefore talk about the US, UK and Europe, as you referenced these in your question. US Yes. Provisional rights are defined by 35 USC § ...


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In the UK, this wording derives the Patents Act 1977 s 1(2), which provides (emphasis added): It is hereby declared that the following (among other things) are not inventions for the purposes of this Act, that is to say, anything which consists of - (a) a discovery, scientific theory or mathematical method; (b) a literary, dramatic, musical or artistic work ...


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It means exactly what you think. The website is merely saying that there always is a way to make software be not software - claiming it as the physical interaction and not as software. Which is why saying software as such (meaning software as software) is not patentable can be interpreted as software is patentable as long as it is not claimed as software ...


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Good answers here are expected to be longer than one word. In this case the answer is the one word no.


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As there is no provisional filing in UK, you have the (nice) option to file a patent and not pay for it. If you do that before 31 March 2021 the cost will be £60, after that date it will be £75 when you decide to pay for the Search £150 and Sustantive examination £100 after the 12 months of the filing date. When you file (and don't pay) you do not need to ...


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I am not familiar with the requirements of UK's IPO when it comes to according a filing date, which is the relevant act for generating a priority right. At the EPO you can follow the same procedure suggested in the documentation you refer to, i.e. file an application but not proceeding further with it, and for according a filing date all you need is: (a) an ...


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The document you link to says the status is "Terminated before grant". Ipsum - Online Patent Information and Document Inspection Service New Search View on Espacenet GB2560881 - Renewable energy wind funnel for powering of automotive vehicles Case Details Application Number GB1704048.6 Application Source Form 1 Publication Number GB2560881 ...


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One thing to remember is that applications get published regardless of whether they get granted or don’t get granted. Your link didn't work for me but I did go to https://www.ipo.gov.uk/p-find-publication.htm and entered GB2560881 to find the particulars. If you go there you'll find a link to "Letter - Search" where the examiner points out that the ...


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As Eric mentioned in a comment, the issue is degree of disclosure. It can be a subtle issue. A publication that explained a result but did not show how to achieve the result would not be novelty breaking. If you think that might be your situation you can file an application and provide the USPTO with all of the information about the publication. Dates, ...


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Thats a US patent. Follow the google link to espacenet and search the patent family tab for european/UK patents.


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So your question actually raises two issues, which I will cover separately. Can I patent a genetically modified animal? Yes. In the US, it has long been practice to allow claims to non-human animals. A clear statement of this is at MPEP § 2105: [From 1987,] the Patent and Trademark Office would now consider nonnaturally occurring, nonhuman ...


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One thing that people commonly misunderstand is the geographic reach of patents. US patent law is only going to apply to things that you do in the US (or import into the us), and you need a US patent for it to apply at all. If you have a US patent but no UK patent, infringing activities in the UK aren't impacted. If you have a UK patent but no US patent, ...


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There is no such thing as a "worldwide patent" rather, each jurisdiction has self control over patents covering its territorial region. Thus, a US patent offers exclusive rights to the covered invention within the US while a European patent offers exclusive rights to the invention in Europe, etc. Someone with a valuable invention can get patent protection ...


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