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I'm a scientist at Twist. The easiest way to access RPA is to buy a kit. It's quite involved to make the reactions from scratch so it's not trivial to DIY. There are lots of proteins, not all of which are commercially available individually (and certainly not economically). The terms of supply are available online, but Section 6.4 is the relevant one, ...


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If the paper was published after May 30 2003, the patent application preceded it. The relevant date is not the day the patent is issued, but the day it was applied for. In this case that was in 2006. But it is a continuation of an application filed in May 30 2003. That information appears on the face of the patent under the heading "Related U.S. Application ...


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I don't know about other countries, but in the United States if a patent application has been published, you can find all the documents filed in that case by looking on Public PAIR by patent application number. That is true even if a patent is never granted. You can see, among other things, the reasons for the rejection that were given by the patent examiner....


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This is definitely an area where you are going to need to seek professional legal counsel. There are many issues here which will need careful navigation. Depending on the invention there may be pending patents which could undermine your business case. Imagine investing large sums of money into a product only to discover that a patent was newly issued in ...


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I have been using Totalpatent and Totalpatentone from LEXISNEXIS and STN from CAS all three are paid version. If your need is only for research, Google patent or Patent lens would do work. The paid versions offer an extra edge for professionals who always need to monitor the patent status or continuation applications. The differences which I had observed ...


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Regarding the U.S. only. There is a very specific carve out for generic pharmaceuticals in the process of approval, but no, there is not a general research exemption in the U.S.. Copyright has a "fair use" doctrine, patents do not. The last time the CAFC took this on they said it might be ok - “solely for amusement, to satisfy idle curiosity, or for ...


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One of the most old patent collections is that of Espacenet. https://worldwide.espacenet.com/advancedSearch?locale=en_EP Just type the name of your grandfather. You can try the same search here: https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/structuredSearch.jsf If it's a US patent, it should be there ;)


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This is the kind of thing that commercial IP databases do well. The assignment information is available from the various national patent offices. The commercial concerns cross reference all of the assignments with data from state/national corporate registration databases to ensure that these are all found. The process is, I expect, rather intensive and so ...


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Well, google for example does track your search history and at least use abstract statistics. I don't know how much detailled analysis they do (automatically), it's probably hard to find out. I'd say it's not easy to answer your question, but I know at least one patent attorney who is convinced that what you describe can actually happen. From a patent law ...


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You can get a machine translation of the Abstract on Espacenet: http://worldwide.espacenet.com/publicationDetails/biblio?CC=US&NR=6309010B1&KC=B1&FT=D Google Translate would be my next suggestion.


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Questions about the model and product are off-topic for Ask Patents. See faq for more information about which questions are on-topic here. Questions about old patents are generally on-topic. The entertainment value is high and the history of technology as expressed through patent documents is usually interesting to our community. The original patent in ...


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The simple answer is that the USPTO Assignment Record Database is a complete mess and cannot really be relied upon to point you to the correct owner. There are many "off record" transactions. In your case, the assignment from "C" may also be something like a quitclaim deed.


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I'm guessing there is some way to do this with Google Scholar, but haven't discovered it yet. If you try The Lens, you can do something close by searching on a term relevant to the article you are looking for and then trying to find the article in the "Cited Articles" option and selecting it. In addition, there seems to be a new capability at The Lens ...


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I recently came across a beautiful public tool which shows patents (currently indexed) citing research article. I have not tested in details but seems to work for me. I also believe it doesnot list all the patents but nice way to start. this requires following steps:- Search your citation in NCBI PUBMED. Locate the reference in list of result. open the ...


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It all depends on the claim wording in their issued patent. You must do everything that at least one claim says in order to infringe. The claims specify what they own.


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